Monthly Archives: November 2016

Personalised Placemats Free Sewing Tutorial

Welcome to our easy-peasy personalised quilted placemat tutorial.  What makes it easy peasy?  We use Pellon Quilters Grid and iron on applique letters to take the stress out and make piecing together quick and accurate.

easy-peasy-quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-1

Finished size: Approx 44cm x 36cm

Requirements

14 x 10cm squares of fabric (we used Riley Blake’s Princess Dreams collection)

1x 20cm x 30cm rectangle of fabric for the centre of the placemat

1x 38cm x 47cm of fabric for the back of the placemat

1 x MAX 10cm x 25cm of fabric for your applique (name in the centre)

2 x 6.5cm x full width of the fabric for binding

1x 38cm x 47cm of H630 fusible fleece (Use H640 for a more padded feel)

1x 38cm x 47cm of H650 double sided fusible fleece

1 x MAX 10cm x 25cm of Heat n Bond Adhesive for your applique (use Heat n Bond Ultra for a no-sew option, Heat n Bond Lite if you want to sew your applique onto your placemat).

1 x 45cm x 55cm Pellon 820 Quilters Grid

 

Instructions

Place your rectangle of Pellon 820 in front of you, adhesive side up (the grid will look fainter on this side).

Arrange your fabric squares on the Pellon, using the grid to help line up the pieces.  Aim to get the raw edges butting up against each other but don’t worry about gaps of the odd mm here and there.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-step-1-pellon
When you are happy with the design, iron the two layers together.  Trim away any excess Pellon, turn over and press again, making sure all the squares are stuck down.

Fold the right edge of the mat in towards the left.  The resulting fold should run between the first two columns of squares (see image below).  Pin the two layers together and then sew together, with your sewing machine foot running along the edge of the fold.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-step-2-piecing
Fold the mat over again towards the left, with the new crease running down between the next columns of squares (and through the main rectangle in the centre) and sew again.  Repeat this process working across your placemat until all the columns have been sewn.  Then iron the placemat flat.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-step-3-piecingmore
You now need to repeat this process working from the top to the bottom. Start by folding the top row down, along the gap between the first two rows of squares.  Sew with your sewing machine foot in line with the fold as before.

Keep repeating this process, folding down a row, and sewing until you run out of rows.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-step-1-piecing-finished
BEFORE ironing your mat, trim the seam allowance on the rows you have just sewn, back by approx. half (this will reduce the bulk).  Then turn over your mat and iron flat.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-iron
Put your placemat to one side and take your applique fabric, heat n bond adhesive and letter templates.

The letter templates are printed in mirror image, they will face the right way when you have finished!  Place your heat n bond adhesive over the top of the templates, and trace the letters you need for your name (you will be writing on the smooth side of the paper).

Iron the adhesive (bumpy side facing the back of your fabric) onto the back of your applique fabric and then cut your applique shapes out.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-applique-making

Peel the backing paper off each of your letters and arrange them in the centre of your placemat.  When you are happy with their position, iron into place.  If you have used Heat n Bond Ultra, skip onto the next step.  If you have used Heat n Bond Lite, top stitch your applique shapes.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-applique-top-stitch
The next step is to add the backing and wadding.  Start by ironing your H630 or H640 onto the back of your placemat- REMEMBER – you cannot iron directly on top of the interfacing, you will need to iron on the placemat, with the interfacing behind, or place a cloth between your iron and the interfacing (the bumpy side of the interfacing should be facing the back of the placemat).

Now place your backing fabric in front of you, back of the fabric facing you, and then place your piece of H650 on top, followed by your placemat.  Iron the three layers together until firmly fused.

Trim back your placemat to get rid of excess interfacing and ensure the mat is squared off.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-adding-layers

Almost finished!  The next step is to make the binding tape for the edges and then sew it into place.

Take your two pieces of binding fabric and place them together, so that the right sides are facing each other, and they form a right angle, with approx. 1cm (1/2”) of fabric sticking out on each side (see image below).  Pin the two pieces of fabric together and then sew across the square where they overlap, from the top left corner to the bottom right (imagine you are cutting off the outside corner).

Open the binding out and iron the seam out flat, trim away any excess fabric from the top and bottom edges.

Finish your tape by folding in half so that the long raw edges lines up, and iron.

placemat-binding

Pin your binding into place on one side on the back of your placemat (I pinned it on the wrong side in the first image!).  You are looking to get the tape to start about 1/3rd of the way down the side, and you will actually start sewing about 12-15cm below the start of the fabric.

Sew down your tape STOPPING approx. 12mm (1/4”) from the edge of the placemat.  Move away from your sewing machine and fold the tape back into a triangle as shown in the image below.  Then fold the tape back into position along the next side of the mat and pin into place.

Sew from the corner until you get approx. 12mm (1/4”) from the next corner and repeat these steps.

Continue until you are approx. 12-15cm from the start of the tape.

quilted-placemat-sewing-tutorial-binding

You now need to join the two ends of the tape and sew the binding into place on the back of the placemat.   I have copied the instruction written for our Little Ark quilt below to help you with this.

Lay the tape into position, overlapping the ends.  Trim the end of the top tape, so that it ends 6.5cm over the start of the bottom tape.

joining-tape-quilt-binding-1
Unpin the start of the tape and then open out both ends of the tape.  Place the two ends together, right sides facing and at a right angle to each other (see image above) and sew together along the yellow line in the image above.  Turn the fabric over and check that the binding tape falls flat on the quilt, adjust if necessary, when you are happy with the finish, trim the excess fabric away and iron the seam flat.

Fold the binding tape back in half and pin into place along the edge of your placemat and sew together.

Turn your placemat over and hand sew the binding onto the reverse (you make find the corners are easier to sew if you cut the tip of the placemat’s corners away first – TAKE CARE NOT TO cut through the binding).

Instructions Taken From our Little Ark Quilt Tutorial

Start half way down one side.  Put a knot in your cotton and sew it into the edge of the quilt, don’t go through to the front of the quilt, just down and back up through the quilt back and batting.

binding-little ark - part 1

Take your needle up through the binding on the crease (fold) line.

Push the needle back down as close to the point where you just came through as possible (making an almost invisible stitch) pass the needle down through the backing fabric and batting (do not go through to the front, just the back and batting) and back up into the middle of the binding, stopping inside the crease.   Then push the needle along the INSIDE of the crease, before coming back up out of the top of the binding (see image below).  Repeat these steps to the corner.

binding-little ark - part 2

When you reach the corner, finish with the needle pointing up out of the backing fabric, ready to go back into the binding tape.  Fold the next side of the binding tape over to make a mitred corner (the fabric should be folded into a triangle as in the first image below, before folding over).  Take the needle up through the point of the triangle (if you are using very wide binding you might want to add a few stitches along the mitred edge).  Then turn the quilt and work the next side. Continue sewing sides and corners until you get back to the start.

binding-little ark - part 3

Finished!

Admire your handy work and don’t forget to send us a picture – on Facebook (Printstopolkadots) or by tagging us in on Instagram #printstopolkadots – we love seeing your makes.

For a printer friendly version click here (you will also need our applique letter templates – available here).
To buy the fabrics used above (Riley Blake’s Princess Dreams) click here
To buy this project as a kit click here

The Perfect Drawstring Storage Bag – Free Sewing Tutorial

drawstring-bag-tutorial-main-image
Welcome to FREE our drawstring bag sewing tutorial.  We can’t claim to have invented drawstring bags, but we think our approach to making them is a bit special.  We have refined the pattern to ensure all the raw edges are hidden inside the bag – without the need to use a lining (so keeping the cost down!) and the ribbons are sewn in to prevent them being pulled out by an over enthusiastic end user!

We hope you enjoy using our tutorial, please do share your makes with us on Facebook or Instagram #printstopolkadots.

The Tutorial

Finished size: Customized!

Requirements

The size of your drawstring bag is entirely up to you!

If you need your drawstring bag to be a specific size, complete the table below to work out your requirements:

Finished width x length                                     …………. X …………..

Finished width plus 4cm                                   ………….. width of fabric required

Finished length plus 7cm                                  ………….. length of fabric required*

If you already have a piece of fabric and want to know how big a bag you can make with it…

Fabric width x length                                        …………. X …………..

Fabric width minus 4cm                                    ………….. finished width

Fabric length minus 7 then divided by 2         ………….. finished length*

In addition to your fabric, you will need 2x pieces of ribbon approx. 1.75-2 times the finished width of your bag.

If you would like to make a label slot on the front, you will also need a small piece of clear PVC (we bought 0.5mm clear PVC from Ebay).

*For fabrics with a particular direction add an additional 4cm.

This pattern involves folding your fabric in half to make the basic bag shape, with the fold running along the bottom.  If your fabric has a clear direction this will result in the pattern being upside down on one side of your bag.  If you want the fabric to be facing the right way on both sides, you will need to cut your fabric in half (along the bottom) and turn one piece around to ensure both sides are facing the right way up. 

Pin your two pieces of fabric together, wrong sides facing each other, double checking pattern direction on both sides. Sew together along the bottom, then cut the seam allowance back by half.

Turn your fabrics out so that the right sides are facing each other and the sewn line is running along the bottom.  Press and then sew across the bottom one more time (you have created a tidy French seam).  Continue as if the fabric is a single piece.


Instructions

OPTIONAL CLEAR PLASTIC POCKET

Cut your plastic to your preferred size and position on the front of your bag, pin into place.

Sew around the top bottom and one short side.  You can use any stitch you like, as long as you have pinned your fabric in a couple of places it won’t move.  We used a tight zig zag stitch to cover all the edges.

plastic-window-in-drawstring-bag

Step 1 – ALL

Place your fabric in front of you so that the part you want to become the top of the bag is at the top and you are looking at the back.

Measure down the left side, from the top, 5.5cm.  Draw a line, 2cm long, in from the side and make a cut along the line (see images below).

Repeat this process, measuring up 5.5cm from the bottom (on the same side) and making a cut approx. 2cm wide as before.

drawstring-bag-tutorial-step-1-free-sewing

Step 2

Still working on the left side.  Fold the section above the top cut line in, so that the wrong sides of the fabric are facing each other, and the fold is lined up with the inside edge of the cut.  Press and top stitch the fabric into place.

Repeat these steps at the bottom.

drawstring-bag-tutorial-step-2-free-sewing-tutorial


Step 3

Fold the top edge over by 12mm (1/2”) and iron the crease into place.  Then fold over again by 18mm (3/4”) and iron once more.

Top stitch the fabric into place, close to the folded internal edge, and then repeat these steps along the bottom edge (we lined the sewing machine foot up with the folded edge on the left, and then moved our needle position to the left).

drawstring-bag-tutorial-step-3-free-sewing-tutorial

STEP 4

Place a large safety pin in the end of one piece of ribbon and thread it through the opening on one side of the bag.  Pull through to the opposite side.  You are looking to get approx. 1cm poking through the side you have not yet cut or folded (see image below).  Once in position, sew across the short edge of the opening, trapping the ribbon, and then trim away any excess ribbon on this edge.

drawstring-bag-tutorial-step-4-free-sewing-tutorial
Repeat this process with your second piece of ribbon in the channel at the bottom of your fabric.


Step 5

Fold the fabric in half, from the bottom to the top, with the wrong sides of the fabric facing each other (you will be looking at the right side of the fabric) and pin the layers together.

Sew down each long side, on the left, where the ribbons are, start just below the ribbons (this will be under the cut you made earlier).

Once you have finished sewing, trim the seam allowance on the two long sides, back by half.

drawstring-bag-tutorial-step-5-free-sewing-tutorial

Step 6

Turn your bag inside out, so you are looking at the wrong side of the fabric.  Iron your bag flat, ensuring the seams you have just sewn are on the left and right folds.

Sew the left and right seams once more (as in step 5) BUT DO NOT trim the seam allowance back.

drawstring-bag-tutorial-step-6-free-sewing-tutorial

Now turn your bag out the right way – ta dah!

 

During This Tutorial You Have Used French Seams – Here is Why…

One of the biggest challenges when sewing is dealing with raw edges, they don’t look nice and when you start using your projects they start to unravel.  You can deal with these edges in a number of ways, one of which is French seams.

When sewing regular seams you place your fabrics together, right sides facing each other, then you sew together and turn the fabrics out the right way, the raw edges are hidden on the back of your fabric, but are still there, waiting to unravel!

When you sew French seams you start by placing your fabrics together with the wrong sides facing each other, you then sew together as normal.  Next you trim the seam allowance back – that’s the fabric between the edge of the fabric and your sew line, you need to cut about half the fabric away.  Then you turn the fabric out so you are looking at the back of the fabric, iron flat, and then sew again, using the same seam allowance.  This captures all the raw edges inside the sewn section, hiding them from sight and stopping them unravelling.

Why not try…

When you get more confident you could..

  • Give your bag a ‘boxed’ bottom – look out for future tutorials on our blog.
  • Applique a letter or some text on the front of your bag to identify the owner, or the bag’s use.
  • Quilt the front panel – a great way to use up your favourite scraps.

NOTES ABOUT THIS TUTORIAL

We used Riley Blake’s Medium Dot fabric for our drawstring bag – click here to view in store.
We also used Doodlebug’s striped ribbon – click here to view in store.

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this tutorial.